‘It’s a major impact:’ Central Ky. organizations helping fight hunger

September is Hunger Action Month in Kentucky. It’s a time to raise awareness— and help feed...
September is Hunger Action Month in Kentucky. It’s a time to raise awareness— and help feed families in the state.(WKYT)
Published: Sep. 7, 2022 at 5:12 PM EDT
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LEXINGTON, Ky. (WKYT) - September is Hunger Action Month in Kentucky. It’s a time to raise awareness— and help feed families in the state.

According to God’s Pantry Food Bank, 1 in 7 Kentuckians don’t have enough food. Several organizations work day in and day out to make sure nobody else goes hungry, which includes Moveable Feast here in Lexington.

“We get calls almost every day of people wanting our services,” said Terry Mullins, the executive director of Moveable Feast.

The increase of calls started during the pandemic, but Mullins said it wasn’t until food prices started rising so drastically that they really began to face some struggles.

“We’re not capable of serving everybody who needs it unfortunately. We try to direct them to Catholic Action Center and other places. But yeah, we get calls on a daily basis needing food,” Mullins said.

Mullins and his volunteers specifically feed those in hospice care, for any reason, and those with AIDS. Driving hot meals, plus bag lunches directly to people, and any care givers and children in the home.

“We get a lot of people who say, ‘I have nothing in the house. Can you start serving me food?’” Mullins said.

While Moveable Feast serves a very specific clientele, they do put people in touch with places that can help. But Mullins said right now, all organizations are feeling the brunt of the high need, and the high costs at the store.

“Our numbers did go up during the pandemic, but since this inflation has hit, that’s where we really see the numbers try to go up,” Mullins said.

As a nonprofit, it makes it even harder to help when costs rise at the grocery store.

“It’s a major impact. We have to buy the food that we have to send out. We rely on a couple government grants, but the majority of our money we have to raise,” Mullins said.

Mullins said they really need drivers right now to physically take the meals to each location. Drivers would need to get to mobile feast between four and five and would be done by seven that evening.